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      • Design, Innovation and Quality - Editor’s Choice

        Published 8 days ago by Paul Jeffs
        • TETRA
        • Police
        • Digital Video
        • LTE
        • Fire

        Occasionally I get to feature some videos and news that have hit the spot with the Public Safety community as well as exemplifying our company philosophy of continuous innovation and quality in design.

        Design Award News - TETRA Pager - news is just in won that we have won a 2018 iF Design Award for the TETRA TPG2200 Pager:

        IF Design Award for TETRA Pager

        The Pager has definitely been hitting the mark as we were also awarded a 2018 Red Dot Award for the Advisor TPG2200. The award jury were impressed with their view on the product ‘Functionality, operational security, ergonomic handling – the two-way pager proves to be optimally tailored to the requirements of emergency staff.'

        The recent Critical Communications World showcased some new and updated products and we shot some really great product demos that quickly capture the idea of ‘purpose-built devices’. Here are three snippets that particularly impressed:

        In just 53 seconds, Paul Wilson takes you through a hands-on demo of the key features and functionality of the new LEX L11 Handheld LTE device including the dedicated emergency button, large push-to-talk button and extended life batteries:

        LEX L11 at CCW


        The second demo is also by Paul Wilson. Here he takes you through the latest version of the Si500 Body-Worn Video Camera, including how it can work with TETRA and ASTRO radios:
        Si500 at CCW


        Finally, here is a comprehensive run-through of the Avigilon Video Surveillance and Analytics demo at CCW. Steve Batt takes us through a live demo of high-resolution video surveillance and shows us how comprehensive video analytics can be used to ensure users see the detail they need and how advanced analytics such as 'appearance search' can search video footage for suspects and more:
        Avigilon at CCW


        I hope you enjoy watching those snippets.

        You can watch all this year’s CCW videos on our dedicated Critical Communications World 2018 playlist

         


        Paul Jeffs

        Paul Jeffs - Editor - Think Public Safety

        Public Safety Editorial Lead for Europe, Middle-East and Africa at Motorola Solutions.

        Follow me on LinkedIn

        Follow @MotSolsEMEA on Twitter and look out for #MSIquality

      • Eyes up. Hands free. Developing tomorrow’s public safety technologies Author: Julian Foster

        Published 22 days ago by Paul Jeffs
        • The Future
        • TETRA
        • Broadband & LMR Voice
        • LTE Mobile Broadband

        Julian Foster sat down with Paul Steinberg, to discuss how Motorola Solutions’ CTO team are developing future technologies to keep front line officers safe and communities thriving.

        Paul: AI, wearable devices and HD video have all been around for a while, but they’re now really coming to fruition and accelerating at a breath-taking pace. At Motorola Solutions we believe in purpose-built technology for first responders. Technology for everyone doesn’t work particularly well for anyone. First responders have unique needs. Harnessing all of that brilliant tech – AI, wearable devices, HD video – to the benefit of first responders is what we focus on.
         

        Julian: There’s so much data out there, the key is getting the right information to the right person at exactly the right time. How are the team going about that?

        Paul Steinberg, CTOPaul: Yes, with such an amazing amount of data available, getting the right information to first responders is a certainly a key challenge. When developing technology for first responders High Velocity Human Factors (HVHF) are a core principle. The more stress you’re under, the less ability you have to focus on anything other than the situation that’s causing you stress. The ironic thing is, the more you need the technology, the less ability you have to cope with what you need.

         

        Julian: That also brings in the importance of sensors – sensing when officers are in stressful situations without them actually telling you.

        Paul: Absolutely right, we’re all walking Internet of Things with biometrics sensors, cameras, audio pickup devices, and environmental sensors. The trick is to fuse all of that together and make sense of it in the moment, in real-time, to discern the context of the individual. What’s the right piece of information you give them? How can our technology best help them in that precise moment?
         

        Julian: So, this isn’t just a story of data. It’s one of analytics, data and devices working together?

        Paul: Absolutely. As we discussed earlier, there’s prolific amounts of data out there. I think we’ve crossed over 15 zettabytes in the digital universe which is an enormous amount of raw material that feeds analytics and intelligence. But it always comes back to the human being. How do we get that information to them in the most usable way? That brings us back to the devices and technology that we carry the information on.

         

        Mission Critical Intelligence

         

        Julian: Where do you see all of this going?

        Paul: Video is becoming much more prolific – growing at about 100 million fixed CCTV cameras installed every year. With GDPR and some of the other regulations coming along, that creates a challenge. We have more video, but more complexity in managing it as well. With us all becoming walking Internet of Things, not only does AI allow us to take all of that data and extract meaningful information in real-time – it also allows us to interact with human beings in different ways. For example, Natural Language Processing – the ability for a human being to have a conversation with the technology. We like to say one of the most important pieces of research we get is Eyes Up, Hands Free – stay focused on what you’re doing, with your hands available to do it. Voice is still the most natural way for human beings to communicate in that setting.

        Natural Language...

        Julian: Project Greenlight in Detroit is an interesting one. The partnerships with local businesses all drawing video together. Do you think that’s a model that others will follow?

        Paul: I do. I think you’ll see that public, private partnership model continue to expand across the world. Increasingly video surveillance cameras and these technologies are pervading their way into the public and private sectors. The more we can fuse that together and get them sharing information and collaborating in real-time – then we’re making an important step towards safer cities and thriving communities.

         

        Jules

        Julian Foster is Global Co-Lead for the Social Media Centre of Excellence at Motorola Solutions

        Connect with Julian on LinkedIn

         

         

         

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      • Designed for the 6Cs? Evaluating your Mission Critical Communications Author: Ricardo Gonzalez

        Published 36 days ago by Paul Jeffs
        • TETRA
        • Dimetra TETRA
        • Cybersecurity
        • Broadband & LMR Voice

        Today, mission critical communication plays a vital role in enabling emergency personnel to stay connected and protect communities around the world. Organisations and agencies – including police, fire, emergency medical services and military – have long depended on narrowband, two-way radio for their mission critical communication needs. Land mobile radio networks such as TETRA continue to deliver proven, reliable voice communication in life-and-death situations.

        Now public safety communication needs are evolving as mobile broadband technology offers additional services, which can augment mission critical voice by giving access to data that can be turned into intelligence to support informed decisions in real time.

        Motorola Solutions has supported customers with mission critical communications for decades and this experience gives us a unique insight into how solutions need to evolve to deliver the model that most suits customers and users needs.

        As public safety agencies around the world explore different ways to address their needs for reliable communications. There is currently some debate in the industry as to whether LMR or mobile broadband is the best solution for public safety.

        At this point in technology development, many organisations are choosing to leverage both LMR and mobile broadband. These serve as complementary technologies – with LMR providing essential mission critical voice communications and mobile broadband providing additional data-driven capabilities. Together, they create a system that is able to respond effectively and efficiently to today’s public safety communication needs. By bridging both technologies, your organisation is able to take advantage of the robust offerings provided by LMR and mobile broadband. This synergy between voice and data is the future of mission critical communications.

        Motorola Solutions has been providing mission critical solutions for generations, and more than 20 years ago, we recognised the need for an efficient, easy-to-understand benchmark for evaluating technology choices. In response, we introduced the five Cs of critical communication – coverage, capacity, cost, control and capability. Today’s environment requires you to consider a sixth C – cybersecurity.

        Together, these six Cs play an important role in effectively assessing mission critical communications. You want to make sure you make the best decisions for the people on the front line, so however you choose to move forward make sure your follow these basic principles.

        1. Capacity: Are your communications systems capable of supporting everything and everyone they need to during times of crisis? Will calls be prioritised so the most important information gets through first? Even with the best analytics, no one can predict precisely where the next incident will occur. Capacity will always have to be managed and when incidents happen it becomes even more important. Priority setting is vital on both networks so that the most important communications are always allowed through. The robustness of our TETRA network in the UK was proven during the August 2011 riots in London. During the riots, the number of voice calls handled by the London switch doubled from 2 million to 4 million.
        2. Coverage: Does your system meet your unique geographical and performance requirements? No one can predict where the next incident will occur. You need a robust communication system with superior coverage across your entire operational area and sufficient back-up and redundancies to prevent communication gaps and losses. Infrastructure should be easily supported and serviced to ensure your network stays up and running when it’s needed the most. The resiliency of the P25 networks in Florida and Texas was proven during recent events – including Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Harvey – where the systems continued to operate with minimal disruption of coverage. Because LMR devices transmit with more power, LMR networks require less infrastructure, making them easier to support. In addition, LMR devices will also work in local fall-back-mode if the network does goes down. And ultimately, when outside network coverage, Direct Mode Operation (DMO) allows them to communicate device-to-device.
        3. Control: How much control do you want over system requirements, design, features and operations? Is it important for your organisation that your system is configured for a specific use case? Many public safety agencies want a high degree of authority over their systems. They want to control who has access to the system, monitor what changes need to be made and when, and track the status of all users. In addition, these controlled networks streamline management and provide network health visibility at all times.
        4. Costs: How would your return on investment improve if your system supported both voice and data? Your agency doesn’t want to have to compromise mission critical features because of budgetary concerns. Analysing the cost of both LMR and mobile broadband services highlights two very unique, divergent financial structures. Traditionally, implementing an LMR network requires a larger one-time initial financial output to develop infrastructure, followed by ongoing, set monthly fees for upkeep and services. Conversely, subscribing to a commercial mobile broadband network is less expensive at the outset, but recurring airtime fees and other data charges can be unpredictable. Determining if the expense scales appropriately with the size of you fleet will be an exercise to plan for. In addition, mobile broadband requires more bandwidth than narrowband LMR systems, meaning additional sites may be needed to provide the required level of capacity. Building a plan based on a balance and convergence of LMR and mobile broadband can provide your organisation access to the most up-to-date communications technology while reducing operation costs.
        5. Capability: Voice is critical, but does your organisation also need data capabilities? Through multiple generations of development and user experiences, LMR systems provide a number of functions essential to mission critical operations. Push-to-talk, intuitive design, rugged construction, unique ergonomics, advanced noise cancellation and high-capacity batteries are all features that have been incorporated into LMR devices with the customer’s environment in mind. Robust priority and pre-emption, dynamic grouping, even low-latency call setup are all inherent to LMR technology, ensuring that a critical call gets through. In addition, LMR technology is decentralised and built for resilience – if part of a network goes down or is disconnected from the rest, LMR service continues to be available. Multiple levels of redundancy and fallback modes are built into the networks to minimise service disruptions under even the harshest of conditions. With a design philosophy born in delivering mission critical audio, LMR is however unable to support the wide diversity of data-driven applications provided by mobile broadband. Today, 82 percent of agencies across EMEA believe access to real-time date in the field is ‘critical or very important’(1). Mobile broadband continues to open up the world of video streaming and data applications, providing emergency personnel with access to real-time surveillance video, high-resolution photos, bi-directional vehicular video, and dynamic mapping and routing. This, in turn, is improving operational efficiency and promoting intelligent decision making. With LMR and mobile broadband providing their own set of unique capabilities, choosing between the two can be a challenge. By bridging both technologies, your organisation is able to take advantage of the robust offerings provided by LMR and mobile broadband. This synergy between voice and data is the future of mission critical communications.
        6. Cybersecurity: Are your mission critical communications secure? Globally, the number of cybersecurity breaches has increased by nearly 30 percent annually (2). It is clear that security is a real concern for public safety agencies. As communication evolves to include voice, data and video capabilities, the risk of cyber attacks for both LMR and mobile broadband networks is expanding. Mobile broadbands’ variety of applications and internet connectivity introduces new opportunities for breaches. With LMR voice communications already highly secure, the movement toward IP-based broadband connectivity is increasing network “attack surfaces.” Fortunately, both LMR and mobile broadband networks continue to adapt to emerging cyber threats, including additional security measures, continued updates and innovative encryption services. Looking ahead, those networks that utilise security best practices and open standards will be positioned well to protect against cyber attacks.

        When it comes to mission critical communications, having the right technology for the right operations is key. As data continues to proliferate and networks become increasingly complex, bridging LMR and mobile broadband enables your organisation to combine their unique strengths into a blended network that best meets the complex demands of public safety.  Leveraging the best of both LMR and mobile broadband ensures your organisation has all of the six Cs of mission critical communications – coverage, capacity, cost, control, capabilities and cybersecurity.

        By working with Motorola Solutions you will be able to take advantage of decades of delivering mission critical communications solutions that will make your organisation more efficient, keep your personnel safe and enable effective evolution to next generation solutions.

        Check out our latest video too - Why is Land Mobile Radio Mission Critical?

         

         

        For more information visit our website to see the full range of our LMR networks and device solutions, broadband networks and devices, as well as our managed and support services.

         Ricardo Gonzalez

        Ricardo Gonzalez is MSSSI VP EMEA Strategy and Marketing at Motorola Solutions

        Connect with Ricardo on LinkedIn

         

         

        References:

        1 – Public Safety Communications –Trends, Priorities, New Technologies - Motorola Solutions, 2017.

        2 - Cost of Cyber Crime Study,” Ponemon Institute and Accenture, 2017.

         

        Follow #ThinkPublicSafety, @MotsolsEMEA on Twitter

         

      • Safer and Smarter by Design - Radios for Firefighters Author: Mike Williams

        Published 43 days ago by Paul Jeffs
        • ATEX
        • TETRA
        • Fire

        Why our MTP8000Ex TETRA Series is much more than just another ATEX radio.

        Fire and Rescue teams have long relied on two-way radios to provide effective communications and save lives. But when firefighters respond to an incident in a hazardous environment such as a traffic accident involving a petrol tanker or an accident at a petrochemical plant, they need ATEX radios to communicate safely and prevent an incident from becoming an emergency.

        So what exactly is a hazardous environment?” What is an ATEX radio? And why would I need one? Well, hazardous places are classified in terms of zones on the basis of the frequency and duration of the occurrence of an explosive atmosphere. (You can learn more about the ATEX and the zones here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2000:023:0057:0064:en:PDF ) Given the nature of a firefighters work, they could well be working in the vicinity of explosive dust, gas or liquid - so it’s important that their radio doesn’t contribute to igniting it. ATEX radios are radios that have been designed to be intrinsically safe in such environments and are classified as to which ATEX zones they are safe to work in.

        ATEX in action

        So how did we build an ATEX radio for a firefighter? We started off by listening to the challenges and frustrations they face every day and asking what firefighters needed from an ATEX radio. We then designed an ATEX radio that addressed these issues, all with the aim of increasing their efficiency and improving their safety in hazardous environments whilst at the same time making the radios easier to use than ever before.

        Easy to Use and more...

        EASY TO USE
        Firefighters need a radio that is easy to use during an incident and when wearing protective clothing and heavy gloves. The MTP8000Ex series radios have a “T-bar” grip that makes the radio harder to drop and easier to hold, even for long periods. The exaggerated control knob to select volume and talkgroup, textured PTT button and tactile keypad make it easier to use.

        We added a display panel at the top of the radio to make it easier for firefighters to see key information such as status alerts emergency notifications, volume, battery level and talk group. The firefighter can glance at the top of the radio to see key information rather unclipping it from their belt or chest.

        For simplicity, the interface makes use of icons and the menus can be configured to only show the options needed for particular groups of users.

        LOUD AND CLEAR AUDIO
        They need a radio that can be heard in the heat and noise of a fire, against the loud background noise of fire engines, or industrial machinery. We gave our radio 1.2 watts of audio power and howling suppression technology so that the firefighters can hear and be heard when it matters with loud and clear audio.

        LONG BATTERY LIFE
        Radios need to last for a whole shift and the duration of an emergency - so we provide an extended battery life in excess of 16 hours, firefighters can be confident that their radios will be ready for a longer shift in the event of emergencies or unplanned situations.

        RUGGED DESIGN
        The radios are going to be used in harsh conditions and need to be able to cope with tough and hazardous situations that the firefighters will face. The MTP8000Ex Series radios are rugged to comply with MIL-STD 810 D/E/F/G and have IP65, IP66 and IP67 ratings, so they will work in the cold and wet or the dust and heat.

        KEEP IN CONTACT
        It’s important for firefighters to be able to communicate and high receiver sensitivity and high transmit power gives the MTP8000Ex Series greater coverage and enhanced in-building performance. They also need to know how good their signal strength is, so that they can ensure they can communicate. Our innovative solution was to add a LED Coverage Indicator at the base of the antenna, which clearly shows the user when coverage is good, poor or marginal.

        Keep In Contact

        IDENTIFY YOUR OWN RADIO
        Our customer research showed us that many users mark their radio in some way to distinguish it from others, often using a sticky label or a permanent marker to write a name or number on the radio. This can often compromise the ATEX certification and as a result put the safety of the users at risk. So we added a nameplate to the back of the MTP8000Ex radios so that firefighters can write their name or number on the tab behind a clear Perspex cover enabling the radios to be easily identified without compromising safety.

        ATEX ACCESSORIES
        Firefighters also need a complete ATEX communications solution which means they need ATEX audio accessories such as the ATEX active noise cancelling remote speaker microphone  or an integrated microphone and earpiece to enable them to focus on the incident while keeping them safe.

        With over 20 years of experience providing intrinsically safe two-way radios, and by understanding the needs of the firefighter we were able to think smarter about the design of the radio.

        Built to the latest ATEX and IECEx safety standards, the MTP8000Ex Series radios have been specifically designed for people who need to work in hazardous environments with potentially explosive gases or chemical vapours, flammable liquids or combustible dust. These radios provide firefighters with the ability to work safer, work smarter and work anywhere with powerful audio, enhanced coverage, extended battery life, greater ruggedness, advanced ergonomics and increased usability.

        Through a series of simple and innovative design features we have made the MTP8000Ex Series much more than just another ATEX radio.

         

        Check out MTP800OEx Series online and learn more about our dedicated ATEX accessories here.

         

        Mike Williams

        Mike is EMEA Solutions Marketing Manager at Motorola Solutions

        Connect with Mike on LinkedIn

         

         

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      • Do You Know the True Cost of Maintaining a Land Mobile Radio (LMR) System? Author: Graeme Casey

        Published 57 days ago by Paul Jeffs
        • TETRA
        • Advanced Services
        • Government Network Operators
        • APCO

        If you’re planning to invest in a Land Mobile Radio (LMR) system, or already have one in place, you want to ensure the system can support your organisation’s communication needs, both today and years down the line. As LMR systems become more IP-based, critical communication has become more powerful and more complex with integrated data applications and advanced features. Today’s mission-critical networks offer technology such as geofencing tracking and biometrics, making public safety agencies and other organisations more efficient and intelligent, but also creating new management challenges.

        To future-proof your investment and to deliver the desired performance, scalability, and cost throughout its lifecycle, it’s important to understand how to address the increasing intricacies of LMR system maintenance and management.

        In our new white paper, “The Real Costs of Operating LMR Systems,” we help you gain an accurate picture of the costs associated with effective LMR management.

        Learn more about what’s needed to:

        • Spearhead system upgrades to optimise security and performance

        • Attract, train and retain a team of skilled personnel — from subscriber technicians to networking monitoring

        • Safeguard your system from cyber-attacks and reduce risk

        • Create a Network Operations Center (NOC) to assess and remotely resolve a range of events, such as provisioning and base station issues

        • Meet public safety standards via activities such as frequency licence management and tower inspections

        TCO White Paper

        Once you have a comprehensive understanding of the total system maintenance cost, you can assess your operations to identify gaps and areas for improvement, then determine the most effective strategy for the ongoing management of your system. That strategy can help you understand which efforts can be supported in-house, which can be managed by a trusted partner, and even whether a hybrid approach that provides the best of both worlds is warranted.

        Ready to understand the true costs of your LMR system? Download our paper today.

        With a proven track record in successfully operating more than 500 LMR systems worldwide, we can help you achieve your performance targets and desired outcomes –check out www.motorolasolutions.com/services

        Graeme Casey

        Graeme is Global Service Portfolio Manager at Motorola Solutions

        Connect with Graeme on LinkedIn

         

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        join us

         

      • Pronto Digital Policing – Stories from the frontline Author: Chief Inspector Ian Williams, West Yorkshire Police

        Published Jun 15 2018, 10:22 AM by Paul Jeffs
        • Smart Public Safety Solutions
        • Police

        I have a confession. I’m a semi technophobe. That might come as a surprise, bearing in mind I’m the Business Lead for all things digital at West Yorkshire Police (WYP). But from my point of view, it’s important that the frontline officers I represent not only understand what they’re getting – but it actually works for them as well.

        As the fourth biggest Police force in the country, WYP have about 5,500 mobile devices in the field. From those we do about 150,000 integrated transactions per month – including 8,000 statements. This does not include searches of local and national systems. In order to enable that, we’ve introduced additional accessories such as folding Bluetooth keyboards to make things easier for our officers. But you have to be careful. It’s not about loading officers with all the latest kit – they have enough to carry already. It’s about simplifying things so officers have access to all the information they need, and can input information easily – without weighing them down.

        Pronto in the StationWhat we like about Pronto is the ability to integrate it with all our back-office systems. It’s intuitive in terms of its use. For example, you can get assigned to a log and because someone has already taken that call-taker’s details – you can then re-use those details in intelligence or a statement. In fact, an officer can come away having completed five different transactions or forms without ever needing to complete the person’s details. That’s a huge saving in time and efficiency which allows officers to spend more time out in the community.

        We’re doing over 10,000 hours of inputting via the Pronto Application every month. That gives you an idea of how much our officers are on-board. Just think about the amount of time that’s saving officers from having to drive back to the station to print off documents, log on to systems, or even have a cup of tea in the canteen. Now of course, we’re not saying officers can’t catch up with colleagues, we’re saying we’d rather they did it in their local café – where they can input information on their mobile devices and be visible in the community.

        Pronto in the fieldStep back a few years, and officers were completing paper-based forms where they could easily miss fields. Because the fields on Pronto are mandatory you get a more thorough picture of all the important information. It’s far more accurate. But it’s more timely too. If you imagine someone has just been arrested and brought back into custody – you have a certain amount of information on statements already, but there might be some detail missing. You can dispatch an officer to take an additional statement and upload it. Within a minute, that can be used to disclose to the defence, to take into interview, or to send to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to get a decision. The saving in time for a situation like that shouldn’t be underestimated.

        You also shouldn’t underestimate the importance of mobile access to data. This enables officers to make more informed decisions to ensure the safety of themselves, the public, and vulnerable victims.

        Our digital transformation journey hasn’t all been plain sailing. Understandably, we’ve encountered challenges along the way which you can group into 3 areas: culture, integration, security.

        In the UK, we’re proud that we invented policing. Sir Robert Peel did that with the Bow Street Runners back in 1829 – and that formed the basis for every Police force in the country. But it’s notable that for the next 140 years there was no innovation in policing whatsoever. When I joined in 1989, I was issued with the same truncheon as was issued over a century before. It actually took a company named Motorola to introduce Two-Way Radios about 50 years ago and that was the biggest cultural change in policing since its inception.

        Over the next 50 years, policing didn’t see a great deal of innovation. We did start to computerise a lot of our processes, but much of that was in silos with 43 forces all going in their own separate ways. Within those forces there were separate systems. None of it was really joined up. More importantly it drove officers back to the station because they now needed a desktop to input their information where they once did it on paper forms carried with them. Although policing was making progress, the next really big innovation was mobile data. That was a real change.

        Now, it’s not that police officers are against change, it’s just that they’re very process-driven. You need to demonstrate that what you’re giving them is better than what’s been tried and tested. When we started our digital transformation, all officers accepted that they wanted something small and easy to carry. But what they didn’t understand was that we couldn’t give them the same desktop experience on a something as small as a smartphone which is why we chose Android. Some Forces did not take that leap and chose to deliver a Windows view via tablet. However, the downside of this is a loss of mobility.

        Of course, our officers had their own smartphones which offered them a really good experience. We had to educate them that we couldn’t deliver that type of experience straight away because there are all sorts of security implications involved – in terms of the data Police forces have access to. It’s important to remember, the mobile devices that Police use are not consumer-grade “mobile phones”. They’re pocket computers that have access to all sorts of sensitive information that we must protect. This means we have to consider how we use USB ports, Bluetooth, complex passcodes etc.

        We wanted to integrate everything when we began our digital transformation journey. WYP were already quite a forward-thinking Police force. We’d got rid of a lot of back-office functions so officers were already used to logging crimes etc themselves. Our challenge was to deliver a near-desktop capability to the frontline. It took time for people to get used to changes such as how you search for information on an Android device vs on a desktop.

        When it comes to security, each individual Police force make their own decisions on how much risk their prepared to undertake. Currently, those decisions are not centralised. Sometimes you can find that you’ve been working on something – only to find another force has done it already.

        With mobile data, we’ve all started to work more collaboratively – amongst ourselves, but also with other forces too. It’s been a huge step forward for us. Now we’re firmly on the road to digital transformation, there are about 18 UK Police forces all collaborating to help develop Pronto. I’m the first to admit that we’re all stealing with pride from each other.

        What have we delivered so far?
        WYP currently have about 28 different processes in Pronto including; crime, intelligence, domestic violence risk, sudden death, statements, interviews out of station, stop and search, ticketing, use of force, data protection, victim updates, command and control, mental health, and missing persons. We’ve consciously targeted the frontline to improve efficiency.

        Pronto ForensicsOn the back of what we’ve done for the frontline, we’ve also delivered integration for Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) too. WYP CSI covers the whole region and they are all now integrated with several systems – both local and national. That enables them to collect all their evidence, bag it up, enter it on the systems and get results before they’ve even left the scene. We’ve had instances where victims have been identified within an hour and warrants have been issued. That just wouldn’t have happened in years gone by.

        Pronto Mobile Biometrics is our most recent digital transformation project. Initially that has meant officers can take fingerprints at the scene and identify a suspect in less than 60 seconds – all via the Home Office Biometrics Gateway and a Police National Computer (PNC) check. It’s also going to enable other projects such as facial recognition. There’s huge time savings with this. Imagine if you have a shop lifter and you’re able to identify them on the scene and issue a ticket. That saves all the custody time of bringing them back to the station. 

        What does Digital Policing success look like?
        There was an officer who sent me a Direct Message on Twitter a few weeks ago. She was on four rest days and wanted to know where our next mobile data clinic was because the USB port on their device was broken. That officer was willing to drive in to get their device fixed because they didn’t want to return to duty without that critical bit of kit working perfectly. That’s real progress.

        There’s still a long way to go. But there’s huge potential for Digital Policing in the UK – as long as Police forces keep collaborating and laws keep pace with the innovations in technology.

        Ci Williams

        Chief Inspector Ian Williams – West Yorkshire Police

        Follow Chief Inspector Ian Williams on Twitter

        Connect with Chief Inspector Ian Williams on LinkedIn

         

         

         

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