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      • MTP6750 TETRA Radio Honoured with Reader's Choice Award

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        NEWS. German publication Funkschau recognised the MTP6750 in the professional radio solutions category.

        Motorola Solutions' MTP6750 TETRA radio was recently recognised by German publication Funkschau with a Reader's Choice Award, in the category of professional radio solutions. Funkschau is a leading professional German telecommunication magazine that concentrates on mobile solutions, voice and data infrastructure, carriers and service providers. Funkschau has been awarding Reader's Choice Awards for several years, and has achieved a respected reputation in the industry.

        In 2013, Funkschau readers were asked to choose from 140 Information and Communication Technology (ICT) products across 13 categories, including professional radio solutions. In total, 55,000 readers participated in the voting.

        The MTP6750 with its integrated 5MP camera is the world’s first TETRA portable radio with evidential image capture. The MTP6750 is part the MTP6000 series which started shipping this week to our customers. The whole MTP6000 series is all about providing a Safer, Smarter and Faster digital radio communications solution.

        The winners were formally announced in a special edition of Funkschau published during PMRExpo, this week in Cologne, Germany - take a look here.

        Take a closer look at the MTP6750 TETRA radio here.

        Paul Jeffs is Editorial Lead for Public Safety, Europe and Africa.

        Paul is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/in/pauljeffs/

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster and #MTP6000 on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

      • How Permanent are Footprints in the Snow? Author: David Parry

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        When a police officer arrives at an incident there is often a very small window of opportunity to collect evidence that will either degrade, disappear or get contaminated. This could be footprints in the snow or a vehicle that needs to be moved to clear away a traffic accident. In both cases having the ability to capture an image and freeze that moment in time can enable vital information to be stored for later use.

        At present an officer could choose to capture the scene on a consumer device, either phone or camera, or request that a police photographer attend the scene. Both options are however, not without their issues. In the case of capturing the image with a consumer device and imaging software two issues may arise. The image is unlikely to be secured with a digital finger print. A digital finger print ensures that the image cannot be tampered with and would be usable as evidence in court. Secondly the device used to capture the image may its self need to be held as evidence and only returned after a case is concluded.

        If a police photographer is requested their arrival may be dependent on availability, priority and the distance they need to travel to get to the scene. In all cases degradation or contamination of a scene can occur. The foot print may simply melt away. In the case of prioritisation it just might not be feasible to send a police photographer.

        The research undertaken by Motorola Solutions partnered with IMS Research highlighted the following:

        Capturing a scene immediately - Specialist Crime Scene Examiners often can’t get to a scene right away. During this time, vital evidence can be moved (e.g. a casualty needs to be transferred to hospital). Even slight changes to the composition of a crime scene can, of course, have major implications down the line. Officers pointed out that it would be hugely valuable – and potentially critical for prosecution – to take images before scenes are altered. Examples cited include capturing a footprint left in the snow and taking images of blood patches or tyre tracks in danger of being washed away by rain.

        Now however, following the launch of the MTP6000 Series TETRA portable radios users now have the option of capturing the moment using the digital camera built into the new MTP6750 radio, and securing it with a digital signature at the same time.

        To read more of the research relating to the use of image capture in frontline policing you can download the report ‘The Need and Case for Digital Photography in Frontline Policing’.

        Take a closer look at the MTP6750.

        David Parry is Director, Solutions Marketing EMEA. David is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/in/davidgparry

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster and #MTP6000 on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

      • Safer, Smarter, Faster and Available Now. Author: Richard Bennett

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        Why the recent buzz around ‘Safer Smarter Faster’? Well, it is all about the MTP6000 series of TETRA radios which started shipping today to our customers. What makes this series of radios different? The MTP6750 with its integrated 5MP camera is the world’s first TETRA portable radio with evidential image capture and the whole MTP6000 series is all about a Safer, Smarter and Faster digital radio communications solution.

        Safer Personnel..

        Your Communications Lifeline - With best-in-class receiver sensitivity, operational range can be extended by up to 14%. With 2W audio through the loudspeaker as well as through the IMPRES remote speaker microphone, users can benefit from loud, clear and undistorted audio to ensure reliable communication.

        Mission-critical Design - Frontline personnel need to trust their equipment. To ensure ruggedness, our radios meet and exceed stringent MIL-SPEC test standards as well as meeting the requirements of ETSI mechanical tests. In addition to optimised ergonomics, the MTP6000 series is IP67 compliant meaning it will continue to operate even after being submerged in water.

        Smarter Decisions..

        Capture the Evidence - Empowering frontline officers to capture evidence can be operationally vital. With the MTP6750’s integrated 5MP camera and Digital Fingerprint authentication technology, frontline operatives can secure mission-critical photographic evidence and intelligence.

        Harness Intelligence - MTP6000 Series users will be able to instantly share intelligence with frontline officers through TEDS data connectivity, flexible Bluetooth v2.1 wireless technology or using the micro SD card for multimedia content storage.

        Faster Operations..

        Automate your Back Office - The radio simply needs to be docked in its charging cradle to seamlessly share evidential images and mission briefings between the radio and back office systems.

        Shorten the Learning Curve - The MTP6000 minimises training needs with familiar, easy to use controls and interface. IMPRES accessories integrate seamlessly into the operational environment with automatically optimised audio profile settings.

        Take a closer look at the MTP6000 TETRA Radio.

        Or take a look at the video ‘TETRA MTP6000 Radio Series – Keeping First Responders Safe.’

        Richard Bennett is Senior Manager, Solutions Marketing EMEA

        Richard is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/pub/richard-bennett/1/19b/238

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster and #MTP6000 on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

      • Bluetooth: Why the “.1” Makes all the difference in Public Safety Author: Tunde Williams

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        CRITICAL COMMUNICATIONS. We all love the wirefree convenience that Bluetooth offers. A proliferation of devices and standardized interfaces have been catalysts of Bluetooth adoption, however they also highlight a key issue: security. For public safety in particular, security is absolutely essential – it’s a tenet of mission-critical communications.

         

        But security has also been a key driver in the evolution of Bluetooth. Yes, Bluetooth has got bad press in the past. New phrases like bluesnarfing and bluejacking were even coined to describe successful hacks. Today, Bluetooth is a much more secure protocol thanks especially to a critical improvement to the device pairing procedure. The new procedure called, Secure Simple Pairing offers fantastic usability without sacrificing security – something that sadly cannot be said for Bluetooth versions prior to 2.1.

         

        Want to learn more? Check out the white paper ‘5 Steps to Creating a Secure Bluetooth Environment for your Two-Way Radios’.

        Tunde Williams is in Global Product and Solutions Marketing for TETRA.

        Tunde is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/pub/olatunde-williams/5/282/67a/

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

      • Urgent - Missing Child Author: David Parry

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        CRITICAL COMMUNICATIONS. This is an alert no one, parent or police, want to see but it does happen and when it does, rapid dissemination of critical information is vital to a successful resolution. The key piece of information officers need is a description of the child and a photograph is always going to be more effective than a verbal description. In a recent research by IMS and Motorola Solutions the use of digital photography in frontline policing was explored and found to be a key capability in improving safety and driving efficiency.

        “The first hours are critical when looking for missing children. Officers consistently told researchers that having fast access to a photo of the child is invaluable. Teams also mentioned time and again that a good photo is far superior to voice descriptions from dispatchers. An example was given of a call-out for a suspect, such as a 180cm tall, Caucasian male with dark hair and wearing jeans and a black top – a description that could match a number of people on any street. But when working with a picture, the search is far more likely to be successful. Indeed, an officer working in London said: “It would be fantastic to receive instant images to verify missing people or suspects.”

        The ability to take, send and receive images from your phone has long been a standard feature of consumer mobile devices. In emergency telecommunications, however, this capability is yet to see widespread adoption. The IMS and Motorola Solutions research looks at this issue and starts to identify specific benefits and applications for photography along with identifying some of the barriers that are slowing the uptake.

        To read more of the research relating to the use of image capture in critical communications you can download the report ‘The Need and Case for Digital Photography in Frontline Policing’.

        David Parry is Director, Solutions Marketing EMEA. David is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/in/davidgparry

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

      • Is Digital Photography Widely Used in Public Safety? Author: David Parry

        Published Dec 09 2016, 8:09 PM by Paul Jeffs

        PUBLIC SAFETY. Image capture can provide real benefits to Public Safety organisations but it is not in widespread use. Why? IMS Research and Motorola solutions undertook research into this topic and found that whilst there is recognition of the benefits of image capture the lack of process, clarity regarding the applicable legislation and proven technical solutions has meant that officers and commanders have been reluctant to introduce it into day to day operations.

        In the United Kingdom (U.K.), where and when photography may be taken is clearly defined under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act (1998). By law, every person has the right to respect for their private and family life. With respect to minor assaults, no images shall be taken without the formal consent of the victim or, in the case of a person under 17 years of age, an appropriate adult.

        The research showed that different countries and regions are at different levels of maturity in the development of policies toward photography. Even on a cultural level some regions have barriers to overcome in order to fully adopt imaging in policing. But regardless of these challenges public safety officials recognise the benefits of having image capture capabilities as part of their crime prevention and law enforcement tool kit.

        The research highlights clear benefits of using digital photography in frontline policing including review and comment on key areas such as:

        • Simplifying of the evidence audit trail
        • Enhancing the capabilities of officers at major operation/incidents
        • Driving greater efficiency

        To read more of the research relating to the use of image capture in public safety you can download the report ‘The Need and Case for Digital Photography in Frontline Policing’.

        David Parry is Director, Solutions Marketing EMEA. David is on LinkedIn at uk.linkedin.com/in/davidgparry

        Follow #SaferSmarterFaster on Twitter.

        Join the Motorola Solutions Community EMEA at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motorola-Solutions-Community-6519590/about

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